Kagame: A body language that says it all

Things have changed. The arrogance of the recent past is apparently giving room to signs that tell that the end of the Kagame’s regime is not far away.

Surprisingly, in the two last years or so, and most significantly during the last three to five months, the Rwandan president has resorted to criminal tactics that presuppose despair.

He has attacked the Rwandan youth, silencing it through the trial of singer Kizito Mihigo. The latter is today imprisoned for having called for true reconciliation between all Rwandans using a song. Kagame is screaming loudly that he will shot people in broad daylight.

The Rwandan regime is burning down public and private buildings (prisons, businesses, etc – 20 cases have been publicly reported) where lives and properties are being lost deliberately. Officially the regime is giving false motives to those incidents occurring almost across the whole country.

Rwandan activist Bosco Mutarambirwa has this to say on his facebook page about the burning of Rwandan public and private property:

“Rwanda: According to this story (https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=629176803289&id=80800621), looks like tons of prisoners have perished in the two prisons that were recently set on fire in a single month.

The rest of fires in quartier Matheus and Nyabugogo bus station are meant to (1) serve as a distraction from the prisons fire massacres, (2) free some badly needed land in the heart of Kigali for Crystal venture builders (Remember Emperor Nero and his fires? http://fb.me/3cKJIKoM2), (3) deprive owners of burned buildings and force their current tenants into leasing space in Crystal venture’s new skyscrapers, and (4) create business for RPF importers of fire extinction equipment… a bill was voted on recently requiring everyone to equip their buildings with fire extinguishers.”

Is the Rwandan president willing to sacrifice some of his achievements if he sees that political power is sleeping away from his hands? Looking at the burning prisons, business buildings etc, one would wonder if this is not one of the reasons that the Kagame’s regime is again resorting to chaos, possibly to make him think that he should always be the man to rule over Rwandans.

 

Towards Arusha ll for Rwanda or end of FDLR!

This is the Tanzanian president Kikwete explaining to his fellow compatriots his position on the relations of his country with Rwanda after his statement on the necessity of dialogue between Kagame and FDLR. This was back in May/July 2013.

During the Rwandan civil war of 90/94, sides to the armed conflict, meaning the Rwandan Patriotic Front [RPF] of Paul Kagame and the Rwandan government of Juvenal Habyarimana at the time met in Arusha for several months of 1992 and 93 before coming to an agreement for peace on August 4th, 1993. Unfortunately this agreement was thrown in the air by RPF which did not want to share power with nobody else. War resumed after the assassination of the Rwandan president on April 6th 1994. It officially ended in July of that year after the killing of hundreds of thousands of civilians from all the ethnic groups of the Rwandan society. Continue reading

Rwanda: Another young voice for change

In recent months, we had the case of the Rwandan singer Kizito Mihigo. Presently he is in prison in Kigali.

Peter Mutabaruka in the above video is a Rwandan student living in UK. He is one among many in the Rwandan youth who believes that things need to change in their country.

Kagame and his group need to stop killing Rwandans and end their dictatorship. There is instead an urgent need for democracy, peace and real reconciliation among Rwandans.

Apartheid Rwandan style must end.

It is true that when you are young, you feel that everything is possible. I totally agree. It is up to the youth to take charge of the situation their country is in and move it into a better territory.

 

 

The new wind of African independence

Let's not be blind this time. Too much water has passed under the bridge.

Let’s not be blind this time. Too much water has passed under the bridge.

On July 1st, three African countries, namely Rwanda, Burundi and Somalia, gained their political independence. Anniversaries make us reflect on past events. More than half of a century since the 60s, it does not appear difficult to realize that a number of things did not work out as expected for these countries. Unfortunately the picture is almost the same across the continent. It’s a fact that the majority of African countries got their independence around that period. Continue reading

Video

Explo Nani Kofi: Some solutions to African problems

The seminar recorded on the video was held in London at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) on November 20, 2013. The theme was the role of community and local agency in promoting Pan Africanism.

Explo Nani Koffi, speaker at the seminar, is a Pan Africanist and director of the Kilombo Centre in Peki, Ghana. He explains a number of critical issues pertinent to developing a Pan African movement.

He highlights for example the importance of intelligence and security inside organizational strategies of development, or the fact of being not too much worried of differing views in terms of approaches.

He points out the fact that practical Pan Africanism does not give up despite the colossal means the enemy in front has available.

The video is worth listening to if you are interested in Pan Africanism issues.