Stop Foreign Intervention In Africa (STOPFIIA) conference at SOAS on 26/02/15

Participants to the conference. Picture courtesy/ Abiola Balikis Salawe Bankole

Participants to the conference. Picture courtesy/ Abiola Balikis Salawe Bankole

STOPFIIA organising group arranged a conference that was held at the School of Oriental and African Studies on Thursday 26/02/2015 in LONDON.

Organizers see foreign intervention in Africa as all the actions taken by foreign powers in Africa which are harmful to Africa and Africans and which are intended to secure the interests of those foreign powers.

This does not only take a military form. It is also economic and as result, African countries have been suffering from foreign control of their key economic resources and Western economic prescriptions. Continue reading

Kagame’s existential question: “To Kill or Not To Kill”.

Protest against Paul Kagame - Madrid - July 2010To be, or not to be…” is the opening phrase of a dialog in the “Nunnery Scene” of William Shakespeare‘s play Hamlet.

The British writer carries on in the dramatic piece with the following verses:

“Whether ’tis Nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune,
Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles,
And by opposing, end them? To die, to sleep—
No more; and by a sleep, to say we end
The Heart-ache, and the thousand Natural shocks
That Flesh is heir to? ‘Tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wished. To die, to sleep,
To sleep, perchance to Dream; Aye, there’s the rub,
For in that sleep of death, what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause. …” Continue reading

RWANDA: IF YOU DON’T SEE IT, YOU CHOOSE NOT TO SEE IT

Hunted Rwandan refugees in DRC in 1997

Hunted Rwandan refugees in DRC in 1997

We are at a point in time where there are 2 types of people who do not see that Rwandan President Paul Kagame is a cold blooded killer.

The first type are people who do not know about Rwanda or Africa in general. While they may have an excuse for the time being, once they come to learn the truth that is easily accessible, they are without excuse. Continue reading

Issue of connectedness in contemporary African struggle

africa_mapDuring the period of African independence, when there was little of the enormous range of today available facilities of communication (instant messaging through a variety of channels), freedom fighters across Africa were almost constantly aware of the struggles of their colleagues in different parts of the continent.

The present reality of neoliberal world order is that when Africans in Libya, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ivory Coast, Zimbabwe, Somalia, Sierra Leone, Mali, Central African Republic, etc are victims of foreign interventions, their brothers and sisters across the continent and the diaspora react with a regrettable detachment. Continue reading

Rwanda Missing Debate: Ethnicity and Rule of Law in Relation to Kagame’s Third Term

The Rwandan president Paul Kagame during his speech of June 30th, 2013 before the Rwandan youth, during which he asked all Hutus, especially the Hutu youth, to apologize for the genocide committed by their parents and relatives. But will his Tutsi peers apologize for the genocide committed against Hutu since October 1st, 1990, this inside Rwanda, and then inside the Democratic Republic of Congo?

The Rwandan president Paul Kagame during his speech of June 30th, 2013 before the Rwandan youth, during which he asked all Hutus, especially the Hutu youth, to apologize for the genocide committed by their parents and relatives. But will his Tutsi peers apologize for the genocide committed against Hutu since October 1st, 1990, this inside Rwanda, and then inside the Democratic Republic of Congo?

A no-holds-barred debate, of the kind that one cannot hear inside Rwanda, erupted online this week. People expressed themselves freely about the ongoing campaign to remove presidential term limits from the constitution so that Paul Kagame can continue in power after 2017. The debate reveals that there is far more to Rwanda than the dictatorship allows the world to know via massive PR. [Let be reminded that the president comes from the Tutsi minority which consists of 14% according to 1991 census, however under the assumption that this percentage is no more what it was at that time given the multiple “genocides” and other humanitarian crimes that both Tutsi and Hutu have committed against each other since – blog’s editor emphasis]
Continue reading