The Upright Man. Ten Lessons From Thomas Sankara

THE UPRIGHT MAN

THOMAS SANKARA: THE UPRIGHT MAN

As Africa is struggling to find its true representative leaders who care for the continent’s people, it is worth revisiting past legendary figures like Thomas Sankara, and hope that present aspirant leaders could learn something from him. The following piece was initially published by Oyunga Pala.

Where did all the genuine African revolutionaries go? They were either assassinated; Patrice Lumumba, Eduardo Mondlane, Samora Machel, Amilcar Cabral, Steve Biko, John Garang, Muammar Gaddafi  or under siege from their own legacies. I am thinking of Nelson Mandela here. It has been decades since we saw a visionary leader that inspired the Pan African idealism of the revolutionary 60s. Look around. Africa is facing a leadership crisis. From South Africa to Egypt, Kenya to Senegal, there is a clear sense of ‘we deserve better’. As African men, stifling under the stereotype of rogue males in power, there are not many examples around to deliver a much needed inspirational wake up call. The only standard for leadership presently is wealth and influence. Simple men with solid characters, sincere intentions and grand visions are consigned to the pages of African history. Continue reading

Andrew Mitchell and the implicit moral right to kill Hutus

Spanish protest against the presence of Paul Kagame in Spain back in 2010.

Spanish protest against the presence of Paul Kagame in Spain back in 2010.

UK former International Development minister Andrew Mitchell was on Tuesday 23/06/15 intervening on a BBC Newsnight panel discussing the case of the Rwandan spy chief General Emmanuel Karenzi Karake, who was arrested on Saturday 20/06/15 at Heathrow trying to fly back to Kigali.

For anyone familiar with the political situation of Rwanda since October 1st 1990, with the invasion of the country by the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF), the main argument that the former minister advances to defend the suspect appears too flawed. Continue reading

Karenzi Karake: Spain set a precedent on February 16, 2003

Cynthia McKinney, former US Congresswoman.

Cynthia McKinney, former US Congresswoman.

“We are here today, representing Africa, the United States of America and Europe, the first time in History that Europe, Africa, and America come together, to champion the biggest Human rights case of all time. Spain took a bold step forward when they decided to prosecute Pinochet. And the entire world was looking at Spain and all human rights activists all over the world celebrated Spain. Continue reading

Was the Rwandan Spy Chief Karenzi Karake worth one million £ of bail?

The building which housed the Rwandan High Commission in London belongs to president Paul Kagame. The Rwandan government rents it from him. This is one of the cases of good governance that Rwanda should be praised for: centralisation of assets and revenues in one place.

The building which housed the Rwandan High Commission in London belongs to president Paul Kagame. The Rwandan government rents it from him. This is one of the cases of good governance that Rwanda should be praised for: centralisation of assets and revenues in one place.

The Rwandan delegation in court was apparently ready to even pay more if they were asked to.

It’s however Rwandans’ taxpayers or aid money which has been gambled on the head of the Rwandan general Karenzi Karake who will be from now on under house arrest until his next hearing. Continue reading

Kagame’s Spy Chief Emmanuel Karake Karenzi: arrested in Britain at last

This picture of young Canadians appalled by the crimes should wakes us all the youth of the Great Lakes region - Congolese, Rwandan, Ugandan and Burundian to stand up against the numerous atrocities the Rwandan president and his allies have been committing for so many years in their respective communities.

This picture of young Canadians appalled by the crimes should wakes us all the youth of the Great Lakes region – Congolese, Rwandan, Ugandan and Burundian to stand up against the numerous atrocities the Rwandan president and his allies have been committing for so many years in their respective communities.

Is the tide effectively turning against the Rwandan president? Last year after the broadcast of Rwanda Untold Story by BBC, I anticipated in writing that the documentary had just started the re-writing of the history of the Rwandan genocide.

If one of the suspects of the Rwandan genocide was arrested in Britain on Saturday 20/06/15 at Heathrow as reported by BBC Newsnight, maybe this could be a beginning of another era in the events which, for the last quarter of a century, have tragically marked the small landlocked country of East Africa, also nicknamed the country of the 1000s hills.

I hope Britain didn’t make the arrest of the suspect as a revenge measure against the cancellation by Kigali of the BBC licence to broadcast in Kinyarwanda, which happened after the public viewing of the mentioned documentary. Continue reading