Tag Archives: Thomas Sankara

Why Africans Should Celebrate Thomas Sankara

By Michael Mungai

“The recent sensation about Joseph Kony should be a lesson to all Africans that if we don’t select the narratives that we would like to universalize, someone else will. And we won’t like it.”

Thomas Sankara, the charismatic and pan-Africanist Burkinabe leader.

Thomas Sankara, the charismatic and pan-Africanist Burkinabe leader.

True heroes of Africa often lie in unmarked graves. Their achievements are only celebrated by a minority of dissidents who are sparsely located around the continent and throughout its diaspora. Stifled by the fabricated feats of the African neo-colonialist aristocracy, the legacy left by our unsung heroes is more endangered than the mountain gorilla.

The African press expediently exhumes their contributions during national holidays, only to bury them again once the celebrations are over. The global media is fixated on despots and warlords. The recent sensation about Joseph Kony should be a lesson to all Africans that if we don’t select the narratives that we would like to universalize, someone else will. And we won’t like it. Continue reading

Advertisements

October 14th – Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza; October 15th -Thomas Sankara

Victoire-behind-bars

Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza, imprisoned Rwandan opposition leader of FDU-Inkingi.

Please don’t get me wrong about this note. It is not trying to compare the two political personalities except what happened to them on those so close dates of the month of October of very different and distant years. I am also only explaining the context when their names crossed my mind almost simultaneously.

I incidentally did the connection when I was thinking about which individuals I should dedicate to the event scheduled this Saturday October 19th in London that the organizers have called Dying in the Great Lakes. Continue reading

Pan Africanism Today

What is Pan-Africanism? It has been a movement against imperialism in all its forms and for the liberation of Black Africans from the evils of Black enslavement, colonialism, and from the racism these produced.

What is Pan-Africanism? It has been a movement against imperialism in all its forms and for the liberation of Black Africans from the evils of Black enslavement, colonialism, and from the racism these produced.

The following are talking points of a presentation I did on Wednesday 6/2/13 at Manchester University for student members of the Pan African Society and their interested friends.

A definition – Pan-Africanism is a dynamic concept of seeing Africa [and its populations] as one entity in its different components: people, cultures, history, and issues without ignoring the underlying diversity of these varied aspects, and considering Africans as one race wherever they are in time and space. Continue reading

Contemporary African leaders to emulate

Women in Tunisian revolution in 2011

…the women farmers who are ensuring the survival of sustainable and environmentally positive African family farming systems and who are opposing the attempts of Bill Gates and Kofi Annan to chain them to the agro-industrial corporations through AGRA (Alliance for the Green Revolution in Africa),…  Continue reading

Let’s not demonize our challengers: a powerful message from William Mpofu

Should all Africans become like Egyptians when it comes to challenging leaders? This is a fundamental question I ask to anyone out there working for change on the African continent.  In less than a year, Egypt and its people are again showing to the rest of the world that masses are tired of being continuously lied to by politicians.

Most politicians if not all are liars. Is Sarkozy less of a liar than Netanyahu, though he treated the latter of being one in a leaked conversation with Obama? You tell me. But this is not about these three, but about South African politics. If one remembers, when Mandela was freed from prison and his country ended Apartheid rule, many in South Africa and the rest of the world, believed strongly in a new era where victims of the discriminative system would harvest in a reasonable period of time the benefits of such change.

Julius Malema, the leader of ANCYL, and a significant fraction of his compatriots don’t think that much has effectively changed since then. For his frank-speaking over issues affecting South Africans and other Africans elsewhere, that officials in ANC leadership cannot address effectively, he has been publicly demonised. The following article from William Mpofu writing in The Sowetan pleads for his defence. Continue reading