Tag Archives: Patrice Lumumba

The blog “Rising Continent” has four years aiming to make a difference in Rwanda and Africa

Victoire Umuhoza Ingabire, imprisoned leader of FDU-Inkingi. She was sentenced to 15 years of jail last December.

Victoire Umuhoza Ingabire, imprisoned leader of FDU-Inkingi. She was sentenced to 15 years of jail last December.

The first post “On Kagame’s Rwanda” was written on February 27th, 2010. A month earlier, Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza, chairperson of FDU-Inkingi, a Rwandan political party from the opposition which operates from exile, had returned to Rwanda. This was on January 16th. I had been to her farewell meeting in Brussels on January 9th, 2010. Her charisma had again touched me. I was going to become one of her millions of Rwandan supporters despite her imprisonment since October 14th, 2010.

The blog was meant to be a channel to update her followers and friends with information regarding her political struggle inside Rwanda. This was one aspect that I wanted to highlight. I aimed as well for the blog to be that window through which anyone could learn what was going on in other parts of the African continent. Since the start of the new millennium, it is claimed rightly or wrongly that the 21st century is going to be the African century, meaning the period during which Africans are going to cease to be seen as the underdogs but become fully part of the global community as equal human beings as the rest. Continue reading

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The world needs peace – but not a Pax Americana

by Cynthia McKinney

Cynthia McKinneyFormer Georgia Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney, who last week completed a peace mission to Syria along with former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark and others, delivered the following address to the IBON Conference on Democracy, Self-Determination and Liberation of Peoples. The conference was held Sept. 23 at the European Parliament in Brussels, Belgium. Continue reading

Message of Solidarity with Kilombo 2013 Conference

Kwame Nkrumah

Kwame Nkrumah

As the 2nd Annual Kilombo Conference starts this Friday 27th September 2013 in Peki Ghana, it is critical for the African Diaspora and Africans all over the continent to be with our brothers and sisters discussing the right way forward for our motherland.

In February 2013 while researching about the history of Pan Africanism I found out that from the initial Pan-African Conference held in Manchester in 1945 at which Nkwame Nkrumah took part, 12 years passed before Ghana became independent in 1957.

In 1958 at the first All African People’s Conference which invited leaders of already independent African states and those of African movements of liberation from across the continent, participants learnt from Nkrumah a big deal in freeing the continent and efforts of uniting it against the then colonialist powers and future neo-colonialist forces.

It is more than a half century since those years of the continent’s political independence and early organizing for African unity, but the context seems not to have changed drastically. Our countries are still seen from outside through the loops of the heart of darkness of Joseph Conrad. Only actors and strategies of exploitation of the continent from that past appear today different, but the fundamentals remain the same as those of back then.

The spirit of our forefathers lives on in some of us. We are today seeking solutions to the real problems of poverty and freedom of Africans at the grass root level in rural and cities. Kilombo Centre is one of such examples.

Patrice Lumumba. He was among the participants of the All African Peoples' Conference held in Accra in 1958 and organised by Nkwame Nkrumah.

Patrice Lumumba. He was among the participants of the All African Peoples’ Conference held in Accra in 1958 and organised by Nkwame Nkrumah.

Though some of us are far from the continent physically, we are totally with you in spirit. Please consider this as a testimony of our total support and commitment to what Kilombo is doing to improve Africans’ lives radically, no matter how long it will take and all the sacrifices to be endured to get there. 

Ambrose Nzeyimana, Co-ordinator
Organising for Africa
United Kingdom

A message from Guy Patrice Lumumba (Lumumba’s last son) to the Congolese youth he asked Kambale Musavuli to share.

Patrice Lumumba

Patrice Lumumba

…when Lumumba wrote “To my children whom I leave and whom perhaps I will see no more…” He was speaking about us. He was reminding us of our inheritance which is the Congo.

He has requested that we read the last letter that his father wrote to his mother, Pauline. He said that in the letter, when Lumumba wrote “To my children whom I leave and whom perhaps I will see no more…” He was speaking about us. He was reminding us of our inheritance which is the Congo. His father gave all of us a mission when he said “I wish that they be told that the future of the Congo is beautiful and that it expects for each Congolese, to accomplish the sacred task of reconstruction of our independence and our sovereignty.” Continue reading

If Patrice Lumumba was imprisoned today…

Honorable Député national Eugène DIOMI NDONGALA

Honorable Député national Eugène DIOMI NDONGALA

Supposedly everyone knows who Patrice Lumumba was. If before reading these lines they were ignorant about him, I suppose they might be foreign to the Congolese history particularly, or African independence period all together. That means that they didn’t either know who Nkwame Nkrumah was. But to give them a clue, from 5th to 13th December 1958, the latter organized a continental meeting in Accra [All African Peoples’ Conference] that the former attended. Continue reading