Tag Archives: Kwame Nkrumah

Kwame Nkrumah, 24th February 1966 Coup and The International Progressive Movement.

By Explo Nani-Kofi

Kwame Nkrumah mausoleum

Kwame Nkrumah mausoleum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On 24th February 1966, the government of Kwame Nkrumah was overthrown through a military and police coup d’état in which the key figures were Col E.K. Kotoka, Major A.A. Afrifa and Inspector General of Police J.W.K. Harlley. The files of the US Central Intelligence Agency declassified in 1999 show that USA has been trying to influence people to overthrow President Kwame Nkrumah since 1964. The CIA backed coup in Ghana was part of the Cold War conflict of the time as President Nkrumah was seen as an ally of Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. This event has resulted in what I call the 24th February 1966 Consensus which has affected politics in Ghana and the total shift from those organizations and institutions that Nkrumah worked as well as ideas and structures which President Nkrumah had. By international progressive movement here, I mean forces together which have been working globally to stop or limit the diktat of a few rich nations and rulers who control this world. This paper will identify some of the structures that Nkrumah was involved with and show how there is a total shift from this politically in Ghana and this shift includes forces which declare themselves as followers of Kwame Nkrumah. Continue reading

After Ernesto Che Guevara’s Visit to Ghana

By Explo Nani-Kofi

Kwame Nkrumah

Kwame Nkrumah

Pre-independence Africa and the period which followed the liberation of the first countries of the continent from colonialism were dominated by a strong solidarity among the latter and other progressive forces from other places. Against the occupation of Africa by today’s neo-colonialism through sponsored autocratic regimes and financed international organisations, it is imperative for Africans to learn from yesterday resistance which enabled to gain freedom and sustain the precarious political independence obtained in the 60s. The following note by Explo Nani-Kofi traces the experience of Ernesto Che Guevara in a number of African countries at the time. Continue reading

Pan Africanism Today

What is Pan-Africanism? It has been a movement against imperialism in all its forms and for the liberation of Black Africans from the evils of Black enslavement, colonialism, and from the racism these produced.

What is Pan-Africanism? It has been a movement against imperialism in all its forms and for the liberation of Black Africans from the evils of Black enslavement, colonialism, and from the racism these produced.

The following are talking points of a presentation I did on Wednesday 6/2/13 at Manchester University for student members of the Pan African Society and their interested friends.

A definition – Pan-Africanism is a dynamic concept of seeing Africa [and its populations] as one entity in its different components: people, cultures, history, and issues without ignoring the underlying diversity of these varied aspects, and considering Africans as one race wherever they are in time and space. Continue reading

Africa under siege

By Kwanisai Mafa

Drone

Drone

“If we do not prepare to fight, we will lose and I mean lose everything.” Kwanisai Mafa

I did a talk with students at the University of Manchester on Pan Africanism Today. After the presentation, one young lady from Kenya described some of the problems her country was confronted with and asked what practically at her level she could do to change what she finds wrong in her society back home. I replied her saying that Africans should stop complaining but instead start working on the change they want to see. I added that they don’t necessarily have to do very much. For example by me discussing with them about the topic I was there for and their attendance were a start for addressing issues. They need only to stop from being indifferent and thinking that the change they desperately seek will be brought to them by somebody else. They should begin confronting those challenges they are not happy with in whatever way they feel comfortable with. Reading this following article of Kwanisai Mafa and being aware of the gradually increasing consciousness among Africans give me some hope. Continue reading